Three Things You Must Sew




With the advent of  the crafty revival there has been the birth of many handy tools and never one used so much as the humble glue gun. While it does have its place in the craft room the over-use and abuse of this tool in today's crafty climate has hit an all time high.

Glue guns are not a replacement for sewing and each time you use one when you should be sewing.. well frankly it just makes you look bad and shouts "amateur" to the world around you.

Rise up ladies and gentlemen .. take your needle and thread in hand and learn at least some simple hand sewing. Basic mending is within the reach of every human. Heck if very young children in small nations can do it for mere pennies an hour you too can do this!

Just three simple things to start - master these and the world of grown-up repair and crafting is your oyster!


BUTTONS - yes the simple button, I can't say how many fantastic items I have found at the thrift for want of only a button. You can do this! 




FIXING A HEMLINEHand-stitching your hem will be the most permanent fix for your pants.
  1. Thread your needle with thread the color of your pants, tie a small knot in the end of the thread.
  2. Mark, turn up and iron in the new hemline then turn inside out.
  3. With the pants inside out, tuck the edge of the fabric down into your crease, keeping it even all around. Pin and press again
  4. Keeping the pants inside out, stitch the top fold of the turned-under fabric to the pant leg.Don't sew too tight, this will cause puckers.


More the visual type - try this video  http://www.5min.com/Video/Learn-how-to-Hem-Pants-155909287 



RIP OR TEAR - Children rip and tear their clothes all the time but there is no reason to throw these away, with just a few stitches they are as good as new.  The secret comes from interfacing with a small simple patch and using matching thread.
Domestic Anarchy Studio
     Fixing a rip
  1. Iron the area flat and trim any hanging threads
  2. Iron on a small patch of  lightweight Pellon interfacing ( found at the fabric store)
  3. Use a small needle and matching thread ( I would have liked this thread to be a tad darker)
  4. Use small even stitches to catch both the fabric and the interfacing for the best stability of stitch

You can do this!


3 comments:

kathleen codyrachel said...

I love this all these hints (lessons) - easy to do and mo messy glue strings
I love your quilts
thanks- kathleen

Gene Black said...

You are so (sew) right! Besides if you use a glue gun and then end up in the hot sun you might get an ugly surprise!

Sharon said...

I hear ya! I was reading a decorating blog that was bragging about her new drapery! She hemmed the drapes with a glue gun!! Seriously, she could afford someone to alter them for her! Love your machine quilting pics on FB!